Top 10 2020 College RB Prospects (Updated 4/16/20)


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*Click on their names to get the full Draft Profile

 

D'Andre Swift

Swift possesses the play traits and running style of a skillful NFL veteran and is the latest in an avalanche of talented Georgia backs. Tempo and decisiveness are his calling cards, making him a highly talented inside/outside zone runner. He’s a cerebral runner who understands block timing and uses quick-cut agility and rare spatial awareness to read and react to defenses beyond the second level. Swift isn’t overly explosive as a home-run hitter and doesn’t run with the violence of last year’s top running back, Josh Jacobs. He can step right in and provide early stability and production as an efficient, every-down back with Offensive Rookie of the Year potential.

 

Jonathan Taylor

Supremely productive, well-built runner with an all-day, every-day mentality that helped lead him to three Big Ten rushing titles. Taylor runs with bend and burst as an outside runner and has home-run speed once he gets into the open field. He displays an ability to weave around interior traffic but might have evolved into more of a thinker than reactor inside due to fumbling issues and the litany of loaded fronts he faced. His patience and understanding of the where/when of blocks allowed him to thrive in multiple run schemes. He’s more body puncher than knockout artist, wearing down his opponents with carry after carry. His traits, toughness and talent should make him an early starter with a solid ceiling and more third-down potential than we saw at Wisconsin.

 

J.K. Dobbins

Good football player who bounced back from a sub-par 2018. Proved he could shoulder a heavy load and rise to the occasion against the best his schedule had to offer. He can make a sudden tackler miss and fits as a one-cut runner, but his running style is more battle axe than buzzsaw as a lunch-pail runner with the fortitude and toughness to wear down defenses. Dobbins isn’t going to be that creative back with the wiggle and juice to create something out of nothing, but he has the efficiency, production and third-down value teams covet. Dobbins could land a shared-carries role quickly and has the potential to become a solid NFL starter.

 

Clyde Edwards-Helaire

Compact, sudden back who runs low to the ground with power and balance to break tackles and the agility to bob, weave and shake them in tight quarters. Edwards-Helaire runs with instinctive eyes and quick-cut foot speed. He doesn’t really have tells or tendencies and can alter the rush track when needed, which makes him so unpredictable for defenses. While he can create for himself, he’s better off working inside-out as NFL linebackers might be able to outflank him on pure outside runs. He has pop behind his pads but lacks short-yardage size. He has the talent to become a good, three-down back in time, but needs to improve in pass protection.

 

Cam Akers

Despite a disappointing win-loss record and a lack of blocking up front, Akers maintained a consistent level of play that represents his football character. He runs with tempo and flow but alters his rush track at a moment’s notice when needed. He is elusive but lacking the instant burst of a slasher capable of stacking long runs in a single game. Akers has above-average open-field vision once he’s into the second level and looks to run through the tackler’s pads as a finisher. He’s a three-down option with good feel for finding the crease near the goal line, but ball security needs to improve. He can be Leg 1 or 2 of a tandem rushing attack and is one of the more natural runners in the draft.

 

Zaccheus Moss

Watching Moss’ game tape is like watching an exercise in controlled violence on just about every carry, but his vision, balance, patience and wiggle are additional skills that help to make him a well-rounded runner. Personnel evaluators for NFL teams say there is wear and tear that could limit the length of his career. He needs to become more discerning with his physical challenges if he wants to see a second contract. He is a great fit for gap and inside, zone-heavy rushing attacks and could become an effective starter as a middle-round pick.

 

AJ Dillon

Built like a minibus but possessing enough vision and finesse to avoid being pigeon-holed as just a pure power back. Dillon is capable of handling heavy workloads and wearing down defenses, but there is a concern from evaluators that it’s taken a physical toll on him. He’s a disciplined runner who trusts his blocking scheme and follows his rush track. He’s a good one-cut runner with below-average wiggle but natural power to create yards after contact. Dillon will find more space as he faces fewer loaded boxes as a pro, but dropping weight and adding quickness could be the difference between a future as a committee back or starter.

 

Darrynton Evans

lashing outside-zone runner with glide in his stride and ability to run with elusiveness and creativity. Evans is a little undersized and might be viewed as a change-of-pace option, but he appears to have the three-down skill set to handle committee carries. He can run with patience, but has the loose hips and agile feet to plant-and-go in a hurry. He sees the field and does a nice job of setting up and eluding tacklers with lateral cuts or stacked moves. While he’s confident in space, Evans lacks the commitment and finishing force to make a living inside the tackles. His third-down and kick-return versatility increases the likelihood that Evans will hear his name called in the middle rounds with a chance to become a solid RB2.

 

Eno Benjamin

Slightly undersized three-down option with unorthodox running style that can keep everyone on the field guessing, including his own team. Benjamin thrives when runs go off schedule but also has a habit of taking them off schedule prematurely. His elusiveness is always on display, but he’s a competitive, tough runner when it is time to get down. Benjamin needs a spread-based running game that allows for more space and freedom but must become more decisive as an NFL back. He offers value in a dual run-catch capacity on Day 2 (Rounds 2-3).

 

DeeJay Dallas

Dallas was a high school quarterback who came into Miami as a receiver and converted to running back during the 2017 season. The production is modest and the instincts are a work in progress, but there are flashes of run-lane feel and downhill smoothness that could be a sign of future development. He has size, speed and a surprising amount of pop as a finisher. His contact balance makes him hard to bring down through contact, but he needs to improve his open-field wiggle. He lacks third-down readiness, but his special teams talent should make up for that. The traits and toughness make him an intriguing upside prospect on Day 3.

 

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